NEW ARRIVALS NOVEMBER 2012

ADULT FICTION

“Flight Behavior” by Barbara Kingsolver – “Flight Behavior takes on one of the most contentious subjects of our time: climate change. With a deft and versatile empathy Kingsolver dissects the motives that drive denial and belief in a precarious world.” — inside front cover

“Italian Shoes” by Henning Mankell“From the bestselling author of the Kurt Wallander series comes a touching and intimate story about an embattled man’s unexpected chance at redemption.

Many years ago a devastating mistake drove Fredrik Welkin into a life as far as possible from his former position as a surgeon, where he mistakenly amputated the wrong arm of one of his patients. Now he lives in a frozen landscape. Each morning he dips his body into the freezing lake surrounding his home to remind himself he’s alive. However, Welkins’s icy existence begins to thaw when he receives a visit from a guest who helps him embark on a journey to acceptance and understanding. Full of the graceful prose and deft characterization that have been the hallmarks of Mankell’s prose, Italian Shoes shows a modern master at the height of his powers, effortlessly delivering a remarkable novel about the most rewarding theme of all: hope.” – back cover

“The Renegades” by Tom Young – “The Renegades is a novel of constant surprise and suspense, a book, in the words of The Dallas Morning News about The Mullah’s Storm, “that’s got authenticity stamped on every scene and a narrative drive that won’t let you go. A terrific addition to contemporary war fiction.” — inside front cover

“This is How You Lose Her” by Junot Diaz –  “An extraordinarily vibrant book that’s fueled by adrenaline-powered prose…Decisively establishes [Diaz] as one of contemporary fiction’s most distinctive and irresistible new voices.” — The New York Times

“Panhead” by Bill Schubart – “Panhead, like Bill Schubart’s previous books — The Lamoille Stories and Fat People — is suffused with humor, humanity, and most of all insight. Schubart has taken his native Vermont and transformed it into a meditation on the human condition.” — Ernest Hebert, author of I Love u, and Never Back Down

“The Round House” by Louise Erdrich – “Written with undeniable urgency, and illuminating the harsh realities of contemporary life in a community where Ojibwe and white live uneasily together, The Round House is a brilliant and entertaining novel, a masterpiece of literary fiction. Louise Erdrich embraces tragedy, the comic, a spirit world very much present in the lives of her all-too-human characters, and a tale of injustice that is, unfortunately, an authentic reflection of what happens in our own world today.”–inside front cover

“The Twelve” by Justin Cronin – “A heart-stopping thriller rendered with masterful literary skill, The Twelve is a grand and gripping tale of sacrifice and survival.” — inside front cover

“The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers – “Kevin Powers has delivered an exceptional novel from the war in Iraq, written in clean, evocative prose, lyric and graphic, in assured rhythms, a story for today and tomorrow and the next.” — Daniel Woodrell

 “Winter of the World” by Ken Follett – “picks up right where the first book (Fall of Giants) left off, as its five interrelated families–American, German, Russian, English, Welch–enter a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the Spanish Civil War and the great dramas of World War II, up to the explosions of the American and Soviet atomic bombs.

These characters and many others find their lives inextricably entangled as their experiences illuminate the cataclysms that marked the century. From the drawing rooms of the rich to the blood and smoke of battle, their lives intertwine, propelling the reader into dramas of ever-increasing complexity.” — inside front cover

MYSTERY

“The Beautiful Mystery” by Louise Penny“Louise Penny has crafted an almost perfect crime – haunting, puzzling, brilliant, and indeed a most beautiful mystery. Chief Inspector Gamache is one of my favorite characters in fiction…This is a tour de force for Penny, and a thrilling, intelligent read.” — Linda Fairstein

“Big Breasts & Wide Hips” by Mo Yan – “This stunning novel, peopled with dozens of unforgettable characters, is a searing uncompromising vision of twentieth-century China, as seen through the eyes of China’s preeminent–and exceptionally courageous–novelist.” — back cover

“Gone” by Mo Hayder“A brilliantly plotted mystery that keeps you guessing not only who that villain is, but what exactly he’s after … First-rate mystery that takes full advantage of the wintry, moonlit West Country and the unusual skills of its lady diver.”–Kirkus Reviews

“Live by Night” -by Dennis Lehane – “At once a sweeping love story and a compelling saga of revenge, it is a spellbinding tour de force of betrayal and redemption, music and murder, that brings fully to life a bygone era (‘the 20’s) when sin was cause for celebration and vice was a national virtue.” — inside front cover

“Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn – “Gone Girl is one of the best and most frightening portraits of psychopathy I’ve ever read. Nick and Amy manipulate each other with savage, merciless, and often darkly witty dexterity. This is a wonderful and terrifying book about how the happy surface normality and the underlying darkness can become too closely interwoven to separate.” — Tana French

“Paradise City” by Archer Mayor – “Mayor’s solid 23rd Joe Gunther novel … focuses on a tri-cornered interstate case involving multiple thefts. One night on Boston’s exclusive Beacon Hill, three burglars break into the house of 89-year-old Wilhelmina “Billie” Hawthorn, who makes the fatal mistake of catching them in the act. Det. Jimmy McAuliffe gets the case and the unwelcome help of Billie’s 26-year-old granddaughter, Mina Carson. In Tucker Peak, Vt., a wealthy ski resort, burglary and arson get the attention of Vermont Bureau of Investigation chief Gunther and his crew. Clues in both investigations point to a buyer of stolen goods in Northampton, Mass., completing the jurisdictional triangle. Another thread follows illegal immigrant Li Anming, a skilled jewel smith who becomes a virtual slave in an unusual sweatshop. Stings, surveillance, and interrogations all play a part in the effort to uncover a sophisticated, ruthless criminal operation. Fans of this first-rate procedural series will be satisfied.” —   PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2012.

“The Racketeer” by John Grisham – “The masterful opening introduces disgraced Virginia lawyer Malcolm Bannister, who has served half of a 10-year prison sentence for money laundering after getting caught up in a federal net aimed at a sleazy influence peddler. Bannisteras conviction has, naturally, destroyed his life, but he thinks he can use the murder of federal judge Raymond Fawcett to his advantage. Fawcett, who presided over a landmark mining rights case, and his attractive secretary, with whom he was having an affair, were both found shot in the head in his cabin in southwest Virginia. Near the bodies was an empty open safe. When the high-profile investigation stalls, Bannister tells the feds that he can identify the killer for them in exchange for a release from jail and the means to start a new life. The surprises all work, and the action builds to a satisfying resolution.” — Agent: David Gernert, the Gernert Company. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2012.

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Kingdom’s Bounty: A Sustainable, Eclectic, Edible Guide to Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom” by Bethany M. Dunbar – These remarkable images tell an even more remarkable story – the way that the most rural region of the most rural state in the union is leading a revolution in American agriculture.” — Bill McKibben

“The New Moosewood Cookbook” by Mollie Katzen – “Since the original publication of the MOOSEWOOD COOKBOOK in 1977, author Mollie Katzen has been leading the revolution in American eating habits… With her sophisticated, easy-to-prepare vegetarian recipes, charming drawings, and hand lettering, Mollie introduced millions to a more healthful, natural way of cooking.” — back cover

“Park Songs” by David Budbill – “Park Songs is set during a single day in a down-and-out Midwestern city park where people from all walks of life gather. In this small green space amidst a great gray city, the park provides a refuge for its caretaker (and resident poet), street preachers, retirees, moms, hustlers, and teenagers. Interspersed with blues songs, the community speaks through poetic monologues and conversations, while the homeless provide the introductory chorus—and all of their voices become one great epic tale of comedy and tragedy.

Full of unexpected humor, hard-won wisdom, righteous (but sometimes misplaced) anger, and sly tenderness, their stories show us how people learn to live with mistakes and make connections in an antisocial world. As the poem/play engages us in their pain and joy—and the goofy delight of being human—it makes a quietly soulful statement about acceptance and community in our lives.” — Amazon.com

“Plutocrats: the Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else” by Chrystia Freeland – “Chrystia Freeland has written a fascinating account of perhaps the most important economic and political development of our era: the rise of a new plutocracy. She explains that today’s wealthy are different from their predecessors: more skilled and more global; and more often employees than owners, notably so in finance and high technology. By putting together stories of individuals with reading of the scholarly evidence, she gives us a clear view of what many will view as a not so brave new world.” — Martin Wolf, chief economic commentator for the Financial Times

BIOGRAPHY

“The Great Northern Express: A Writer’s Journey Home” by Howard Frank Mosher –

From bestselling, nationally celebrated author Howard Frank Mosher, a wildly funny and deeply personal account of his three-month, 20,000-mile sojourn to discover what he loved enough to live for. 

“Joseph Anton” by Salman Rushdie – A harrowing, deeply felt and revealing document: an autobiographical mirror of the big, philosophical preoccupations that have animated Mr. Rushdie’s work throughout his career.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama Bin Laden” by Mark Owen -“Owen was already a SEAL at the time of the 9/11 attacks; the book begins shortly thereafter, as he is qualifying for the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group (otherwise known as the famed SEAL Team Six), and follows him through various missions, culminating with a detailed account of the planning and execution of the assault on bin Laden’s compound. His version of events has already sparked some controversy…but it doesn’t feel as though Owen intended to add fuel to the fire. …No Easy Day doesn’t merely tell war stories–it also explores the culture of war and what it means to be a soldier. ” — Booklist Online. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2012

DVD’s

“Downton Abbey Season 2”
“A Film Unfinished” 
“Kung Fu Panda 2”
“The Lucky One”
“Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted”
“Mad Men Season Two”
“Mugabe and the White African”

MUSIC

“Duet II” by Tony Bennett

JUVENILE FICTION

“Kindred Souls” by Patricia MacLachlan – “From beloved author Patricia MacLachlan comes a poignant story about what we do for the ones we love, and how the bonds that hold us together also allow us to let each other go.” — inside front cover

“The Magic Escapes” by Tony Abbott“When Eric chased Lord Sparr up the Dark Stair and out of Droon, he knew they were heading for the real world. But he didn’t realize just how much was about to change. With them, Eric and Sparr carry the secrets and the magic of Droon. And with magic on the loose. nothing in our world will ever be the same….” — back cover

“Nate the Great and the Sticky Case” by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat – “A stegosaurus stamp belonging to Nate’s friend Claude disappears, and the indomitable Nate the Great is called in on the case. At first, even Nate is stumped — the stamp has just vanished without a trace! But with clues from the weather and his ever-faithful dog, Sludge, Nate is soon on his way to wrapping up his stickiest case yet.” — Amazon.com

“The Penderwicks on Gardam Street” by Jeanne Birdsall –  “The Penderwick sisters…return in another warm family story. An opening chapter, …tells how the girls’ mother died right after Batty’s birth. Now, some four years later, Aunt Claire presents the girls’ father with a letter from his late wife, telling him it’s time to start dating. Rosalind, Skye, Jane, and Batty beg to differ and come up with a harebrained scheme to thwart Mr. Penderwick. But the girls aren’t just focused on their father. Rosalind has her own romantic entangelments; and Skye and Jane write compositions for each other, which leads to myriad problems. Meanwhile, little Batty has become enamored of the widow and her baby son who live next door. There’s never much suspense about where all this is going, but things happen in such touching ways that the story is hard to resist.” — Ilene Cooper AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2008.

“Wonder” by R. J. Palacio – “Wonder is essentially…a wonder. It’s well written, engaging, and so much fun to read that the pages almost turn themselves. More than that, Wonder touches the heart in the most life-affirming, unexpected ways, delivering in August Pullman a character whom readers will remember forever. ” — Nicholas Sparks, author of The Notebook, A Walk to Remember and Message in a Bottle

“Wonderstruck: A Novel in Words and Pictures” by Brian Selznick – “Rich, complex, affecting and beautiful–with over 460 pages of original artwork–Wonderstruck is a stunning achievement from a uniquely gifted artist and visionary.” — inside front cover

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“I, Galileo” by Bonnie Christensen – “In this biography, Bonnie Christensen lets Galileo himself tell the tale–and his genial narration makes this giant of science feel more real and accessible than ever before. Lavishly illustrated in rich jewel tones, this is a perfect introduction to a most remarkable man.” — inside front cover

“Monsieur Marceau: Actor Without Words” by Leda Schubert -“Marcel Marceau, the world’s most famous mime, enthralled audiences around the world for more than fifty years. When he waved his hand or lifted his eyebrow he was able to speak volumes without ever saying a word. But few know the story of the man behind those gestures . . .

Distinguished author Leda Schubert and award-winning artist Gerard DuBois bring their own artistry to this gorgeously written and illustrated picture book biography.” — inside front cover

“When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death” by Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown – “A comprehensive, sensitive guide for families dealing with loss of loved ones, When Dinosaurs Die helps readers understand what death means, and how to best cope with their feelings.” — back cover

BOARD BOOKS

 

PICTURE BOOKS

“And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” by Dr. Seuss
“Froggy Gets Dressed” by Jonathan London
“Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs” by Mo Willems
“I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie” by Alison Jackson
“Llama, llama Time to Share” by Anna Dewdney
“Mossy” by Jan Brett
“Nate the Great and the Sticky Case” by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat
“Nightime Ninja” by Barbara DaCosta
“Oh, No!” by Candace Fleming & Eric Rohmann
“Olivia and the Fairy Princesses” by Ian Falconer
“Pecan Pie Baby” by Jacqueline Woodson
“Z is for Moose” by Kelly Bingham & Paul O. Zelinsky

YOUNG ADULT

 “The Boy Who Couldn’t Sleep and Never Had To” by D. C. Pierson – “Charmingly honest and honestly funny. Nails what it’s like to be a geeky teenage mail, right down to the Agrtranian Berserkers.” — Max Barry, author of Company

“Chomp” by Carl Hiaasen – “Hiaasen extends his brand of Florida eco-adventures with this loopy foray into reality TV. Derek Badger, star of Expedition Survival!, arrives to film an Everglades episode, enlisting the services of animal wrangler Mickey Cray, a sort of Dr. Doolittle who specializes in snakes and keeps a 12-foot-long gator named Alice as a pet. Mickey holds his nose but takes the job, assisted by his son, Wahoo, a goodhearted teenager who’s able to handle his father as well as his father handles pythons. Badger, naturally, is a complete fraud, who choppers off to a hotel each evening while mosquitoes dine on his crew. After filming starts, Badger gets lost in the swamp with only his (dim) wits to help him survive. There are no cute owls or endangered panthers to save—tension derives from wondering whether Badger will get himself killed before Mickey does it for him, and a subplot about Wahoo’s friend Tuna, who’s on the run from her abusive father.” — Agent: Esther Newberg, ICM., PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2012. 

“Graceling” by Kristi Cashore – “With elegant, evocative prose and a cast of unforgettable characters, …author Kristen Cashore creates a mesmerizing world, a death-defying adventure, and a heart-racing romance that will consume you, hold you captive, and leave you wanting more.” — back cover

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